Overview

32 LONG YEARS 1968 - 2000

On May 8th 1998 Reg Kray had completed 30 years of imprisonment. He had served one of the longest sentences in British legal history. The other men jailed with Reg Kray were released on or about the end of their sentences of 15 or 20 years.

Ron Kray died in Broadmoor in 1995 whilst still serving his 30 year sentence and Charlie Kray died in April 2000 serving a 12 year sentence for a drugs conspiracy..

SO WHY DIDN'T THEY RELEASE HIM?

Despite Reg completing the time set by the trial judge, and despite psychiatric and psychological reports claiming that he was fit to be released, Jack Straw and the Parole Board wouldn't release him or even send him to an open prison. They claimed that 'he drank alcohol' and was 'manipulative'. If these were adequate reasons for depriving people of their liberty, we would have precious few politicians, lawyers or big businessmen on the streets!

No, this was a stitch up to keep Reg in prison. He was the victim of a spineless conspiracy designed to prevent Jack Straw having to make a decision about his release. Straw could not do so unless there was a recommendation from the Parole Board, but the Parole Board could not consider release unless the Home Secretary asks it to. Very ingenious! In effect, this means Reg Kray could remain in prison forever.

Although Reg Kray was finally released, due to his terminal cancer, he remained a prisoner to the end.

CRIME AND PUNISHMENT

Reg Kray was almost sixty-seven years of age when he was reluctantly released. He was asked to pay the penalty of 30 years for the crime he committed and he had done so (and more) without complaint.

Unlike some prisoners who had been released recently, among them paedophiles and terrorists, Reg was no danger to the public.

"If we as a society believe in justice and the rule of law, we can - whatever you think of Kray - raise no complaint about his being allowed the liberty for which, over 30 years, he has unquestioningly paid."...... Simon Heffer, Daily Mail, February 1998

Leonard 'Nipper' Read, the policeman who led the investigation into the Krays and their subsequent arrests said:

 "He has done the length of time that the court felt was right for his crimes. I see no objection to him being released."....Nipper Read, Daily Mail, February 1998

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